Everybody has a story. Here’s mine.

My passion for learning is truly something I was born with. Our family standards include fostering curiosity (‘why?’ seems to be the first response in every conversation), engaging connection (we’re big-time community builders), and sharing perspectives (we love to eat, cuss-n-discuss, and tell tall tales). So, even those who didn’t make a career in education taught in their respective ways and industries as mentors and leaders.

I didn’t start out in the classroom.
I spent over a decade in political and nonprofit fundraising and in corporate marketing and public relations. Throughout that time, I learned that people crave connection and purpose. Whether it’s money, voting, hospital care, or their child’s education, folks will invest into people, priorities, and platforms in which they believe. That core value of connection followed me to the next chapter of my story.

In 2009 I joined the ranks of difference-makers as a middle school teacher. With an undergrad in Literature (serious #booknerd), sharing my passion for all things English-y came naturally (#grammarpolice #readersareleaders). Moreover, living out my belief that education should be a positive experience was a non-negotiable and a welcome environment for my students.

But keep in mind, these were middle school students and they can be a tough crowd, y’all…

To keep their eyes open and conversations happening, I used stories.
To bring context, relevance and authenticity, I used stories.
To teach complex ideas and themes, I used stories. 

And it worked. 

Technology, specifically videos, blogging, recordable interactive whiteboards,

provided the media necessary to bring these stories to mind and to life right there in the classroom.

And just like *that*

 

To keep their eyes open and conversations happening, I used stories.
To bring context, relevance and authenticity, I used stories.
To teach complex ideas and themes, I used stories. 

And it worked. 

Technology, specifically videos, blogging, recordable interactive whiteboards,

provided the media necessary to bring these stories to mind and to life right there in the classroom.

And just like *that*

Learning clicked.

 

Learning clicked.

Pedagogy and story are one and the same. 

Pedagogy and story are one and the same. 

We take into account the WHO (learner needs) and the WHAT (curriculum) to decide on HOW (pedagogy) to best connect it

Sound familiar? It should; it’s the universal narrative format: the story arc.

Transitioning from the classroom to district leadership, I took on the most challenging of all learner populations: adults. Tasked with introducing innovation and transforming the learning environment through a full PK-12 1:1 implementation, I took a chance and laid odds that story could be adapted for, (ahem), mature audiences.

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